Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) is OPEN—don’t worry, not physically open. We are absolutely following physical distancing to flatten the curve, to protect others, and to respect the great sacrifices that so many are making. We have been in touch with many groups on their thinking about Coronavirus and COVID-19 responses through a trauma-informed (TI) lens and how this is happening across sectors and regions in the state. Check out this video blog from TIO’s Director, Mandy Davis to see what we’re doing.

As the impact of COVID-19 unfolds, TIO will keep this page updated with ideas and resources to apply a trauma informed lens to response efforts. We are here to address your questions about trauma informed approaches and COVID-19 responses. Seriously, ask us any questions by emailing info@traumainformedoregon.org. How do I talk to my kids about this? How do I connect with my 80-year-old aunt in a different state? How do I monitor my staff’s coping remotely? How do I communicate to staff in a way that doesn’t overwhelm them? Send any resources or creative ideas you are using to promote resilience and mitigate toxic stress in these times.

Virtual Office Hours

Starting Monday, March 23, we will be offering Virtual Office Hours* through Zoom on Mondays 3:30-4:30 p.m. and Thursdays 8:30-9:30 a.m. TIO staff will be here to field questions, think through situations, and promote connection and support. Jump in anytime for as long as needed

  • Monday Office Hours – link will be posted on Monday, April 6th.
  • Thursday Office Hours – link will be posted on Thursday, April 9th.

*This is not for clinical or telehealth/therapy services but instead for organizations and systems to think though response efforts. For immediate support see our list of Crisis and Support Lines just above the section for General COVID-19 Resources.

TIC Resources

There are great resources about responding to tragedies. (see below). Many of these strategies will also apply to helping children, families, and communities cope with what is happening because of COVID-19. However, coping with a pandemic is new for many of us and as this situation is evolving we have the added stressor of things changing rapidly.

It is important to recognize the multiple ways we are impacted including physical, economic, mental, spiritual, and social strains. It is the accumulation of these impacts that can challenge our best coping strategies and may require us to “double up” on caring for ourselves and others. Remember as you encounter others that regardless of a person’s daily disruptions everyone is feeling a sense of distress during this time.

We are using the values, principles, and practices of trauma informed care (TIC) to help us navigate this time. This includes offering grace, empathy, support, kindness, and connection. This also means advocating for a lens of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to be applied to delivering needed services now and throughout the restore, repair, and recovery phase of this event.

Learn ways to implement responses to COVID-19 that are trauma informed with our latest resource, Considerations for a Trauma Informed Response for Work Settings.

Consider these principles as you think about what is best for you and your community. You can find more ideas here in our Trauma Informed Strategies. Add your own ideas here.

  • Safety – How can you provide physical safety (e.g., access to essential services, safe spaces) but also emotional safety (e.g., someone is looking out for me).
  • Consistency – In what ways can you promote consistency even as things are ever changing. For example, getting up at the same time even if you are not going to work, school, or services. Developing a routine/daily schedule for students at home.
  • Transparency – How can you provide clear, direct, and accurate information and keep this updated? Consider offering multiple ways of information sharing (e.g., websites, videos with closed caption, twitter, email, flyers, etc.) and in multiple languages.
  • Peer Support – How can you support each other in this response? Using technology to check in on how colleagues, friends, family, and neighbors are doing as well as sharing your ideas for coping. Join online groups that are supporting neighbors.
  • Collaboration– How are your strategies including those impacted? Are communities included in the decisions and kept up to date?
  • Culturally Responsive– Are you considering the cultural strengths and needs of the community as you plan responses? Who has and does not have access to resources?

Consider these principles as you think about what is best for you and your community.

  • Safety – How can you provide physical safety (e.g., access to essential services, safe spaces) but also emotional safety (e.g., someone is looking out for me).
  • Consistency – In what ways can you promote consistency even as things are ever changing. For example, getting up at the same time even if you are not going to work, school, or services. Developing a routine/daily schedule for students at home.
  • Transparency – How can you provide clear, direct, and accurate information and keep this updated? Consider offering multiple ways of information sharing (e.g., websites, videos with closed caption, twitter, email, flyers, etc.) and in multiple languages.
  • Peer Support – How can you support each other in this response? Using technology to check in on how colleagues, friends, family, and neighbors are doing as well as sharing your ideas for coping. Join online groups that are supporting neighbors.
  • Collaboration– How are your strategies including those impacted? Are communities included in the decisions and kept up to date?
  • Culturally Responsive– Are you considering the cultural strengths and needs of the community as you plan responses? Who has and does not have access to resources?

Here are some thoughts and resources but please send us your ideas or questions and we will do our best to keep this updated (send to info@traumainformedoregon.org). It is important to remember that not everyone has access to the same resources and multiple methods of communication will be needed.

  • Leave flyers at neighbor’s houses about resources or contact information if you are willing.
  • Support healthcare workers you know—deliver meals, offer to walk pets, watch children, etc.
  • Offer to shop for people who need to stay home.
  • Offer to call to check on someone who is home bound for emotional support.
  • Start a text group for when someone is going to the store to see what is needed.
  • Offer to teach remotely about how to use technology to stay connected.
  • Search terms such as mutual aid and COVID-19 in your area. Groups are popping up to offer support such as this Facebook group pdxcovid19mutualaid; Instagram:@pdxcovid19mutualaid

Resources:

Other Resources:

MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

Call 1-800-273-8255 (24 hr)

SUICIDE LIFELINE

Call 800-273-8255 (24 hr)
Text 273TALK to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)

MILITARY HELPLINE

Call 888-457-4838 (24 hr)
Text MIL1 to 839863 (8am-11pm PST daily)
Support for service members, veterans, and their families that is independent of any branch of the military or government.

SENIOR LONELINESS CRISIS LINE

Call 503-200-1633 (24 hr)
Supports seniors in our community who are feeling isolated

WARMLINE

Call or text 1-800-698-2392  (24 hr)
peer to peer counseling hotline

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LINE

Call 1-888-235-5333 (24 hr)

SEXUAL ASSAULT RESOURCE CENTER

crisis and support line
503-640-5311 (24 hr)

SPANISH SPEAKING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LINE

Project UNICA Crisis line
503-232-4448  (24 hr)

YOUTHLINE

Call 877-968-8491
Text teen2teen to 839863
Chat at www.oregonyouthline.org
A teen-to-teen crisis and help line. Teens available to help daily from 4-10pm Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by Lines for Life).

TREVOR PROJECT LINE

Call or text 1-866-488-7386 (24 hr)
LGBTQIA+ hotline

OREGON FAMILY SUPPORT NETWORK

REACH OUT OREGON
Parent to Parent Peer support Warmline
Hours: Tuesdays, Wednesday & Thursdays from 12:00pm to 7:00pm https://www.ofsn.org/
Call 1-833-REACH OR (1-833-732-2467) provides support by phone, chat, email and Facebook messaging. REACH OUT OREGON staff and volunteers are well trained and are all parents. They are here to offer support and resources.

  • Develop a routine with your students for what the day will look like. Incorporate online lessons or ask for worksheets from your school or community.
  • Offer support through technology to other caregivers. This can be emotional support by sharing experiences or sharing updated information.
  • Consider ways to pool resources and offer support via social media.
  • Offer to send videos with lessons or activities, or offer to teach remotely about how to use technology.
  • Acknowledge feelings of worry and disappointment in events missed.
  • If you have a child with specific needs, ask what supports the school can offer during this time.
  • Offer to pick up groceries for caregivers if you have the bandwidth.

Resources: